Monthly Archives: November 2014

What I Wish People Knew about Depression | World of Psychology

What I Wish People Knew about Depression | World of Psychology.

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SUICIDE IS FOR THE WEAK!

Do you thinks suicide is for the weak or selfish person. Are you feeling suicidal? Do you know someone who is? Real below. Thanks for your support.

Centurion Strong Mental Health Alliance

Of course I don’t believe that, but you may come across people who do. They may be in your family, your friends, your coworkers. No one can fully grasp the desperation of a person who is thinking about suicide. There is nothing wrong with you if you do have these thoughts, but it is a sign that you may need to see a professional care provider; whether that is your family doctor, your psychiatrist, or your therapist. When you have those feelings, it is important to know you are not alone. According to the CDC (Center of Disease Control and Prevention), it is estimated that of adults 18 and older

  • 3 million adults (3.7% of the adult U.S. population) reported having suicidal thoughts in the past year.
  • 2 million adults (1.0% of the U.S. population) reported having made suicidal plans in the last year.
  • 1 million adults (0.5% of the…

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SUICIDE IS FOR THE WEAK!

Of course I don’t believe that, but you may come across people who do. They may be in your family, your friends, your coworkers. No one can fully grasp the desperation of a person who is thinking about suicide. There is nothing wrong with you if you do have these thoughts, but it is a sign that you may need to see a professional care provider; whether that is your family doctor, your psychiatrist, or your therapist. When you have those feelings, it is important to know you are not alone. According to the CDC (Center of Disease Control and Prevention), it is estimated that of adults 18 and older

  • 3 million adults (3.7% of the adult U.S. population) reported having suicidal thoughts in the past year.
  • 2 million adults (1.0% of the U.S. population) reported having made suicidal plans in the last year.
  • 1 million adults (0.5% of the U.S. population) reported making a suicide attempt in the past year.

There are people who have walked in your shoes. There have been those who have survived having those feelings. The best treatments for serious mental illness today are highly effective: between 70% – 90% who have received treatment, including medication and talk therapy, have significant reduction of symptoms and improved quality of life.

Mental illness is a serious medical illness. Mental illnesses are not the result of personal weakness, lack of character, or lack of faith. Mental illness strikes people of any age, race, religion or income.

There is no shame or guilt. If you have heard people to say to you, “you’re always feeling sorry for yourself”, “it’s all in your head” or my favorite “there are a lot of people worse off than you.” (I don’t know about you, but I get that one a lot.) But because I have taken the time to build my support team, I also hear “Do you want a hug?” “You are important to me!” “This must be very hard for you” Just think of your support team. Who is on your team? Your doctor, your therapist, members in a support group, the family and friends who are there fighting with you and for you. There may be friends, who come and go, but there will be those fighting beside you and saying, “what can I do to help?” And believe it or not, there are those people in your life who can’t imagine their world without you in it.

So if you are having thoughts of suicide or feel you are in crisis, please call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. I can tell you it works. You are not alone. There are people you can talk to and who will understand. Don’t be another statistic. Your life matters. We are all in this fight together.

Moving Out of My Confort Zone

For anyone, moving out of one’s comfort zone can be hard, but it’s how to get ahead. That’s no different for anyone who has a mental illness. Even if it means taking baby steps. Moving out of your comfort zone is required to move toward healing.

After my initial blog, the first of many I hope. Wow, I thought. This is great. I’m moving. I thought I had it all together. The day after the post, which turned into a week and a half, I hit a brick was. I was filled with great anxiety. So much so that I cancelled my therapy appointment and opted to spend the day in bed, curled in the fetal position. I just couldn’t shake it.

I felt as if I was between two ships and there was a plank connecting the two. The ship I was on was slowly sinking and the only way to safety was to get to the other ship. I start to walk the plank and when I get to the middle, I look down and see the ocean. I don’t know how to swim. I freeze out of fear. My feet won’t move. What if I fall? Are there any sharks? An immediate horror overwhelms me. Do I go back to the sinking ship? I know it’s sinking, but I know the ship. I’m still frozen on the plank and over the ocean, but I see the other ship where I can be safe. I take one last look at the sinking ship and I move forward inch by inch slowly but deliberately. Slow is not a bad thing, as long as I am moving forward. I focus on the feel of the plank under my feet and I keep moving.

My bipolar depression is the sinking ship. If I stay, it would mean certain death. I can choose to move forward toward a healthier me. So, I walk the plank. When I freeze I look over my safety plan. Do I need to see my doctor and review my medications? Do I need to call my therapist? Do I need to attend a support groups? I determine what is needed and I continue to walk. That is where I am now. The anxiety has lifted. I continue to move out of my comfort zone. I am heading toward the light, where the sun shines over the ship to safety. It’s all about taking those baby steps.

You too can take those baby steps. As you move forward, you learn to trust yourself more. You learn to identify what triggers your depression, anxiety or mania. You find a reason to fight your illness and keep moving forward. I’ve reached the ship to a safer, healthier me. Move out of your comfort zone and let’s take that next step together.

Why I Fight My Bipolar

If I had a cold, you might bring me chicken soup. If I broke my leg, you might run errands for me. If I had cancer, you would be at my hospital bedside. But, I don’t have any of those illnesses. I have bipolar disorder and the illness is in my brain. You can’t see my brain, so it’s easy to discount my suffering.

My friends and family know of my disorder, but I don’t think they know the full extent of my pain. They know it’s serious. They know it makes me feel bad. They know that I can be in a lot of mental pain. It’s hard for people who don’t have a mental illness to understand the terror it is to have one. Mental illness can kill you. Suicide is the 3rd cause of death for people between the ages of 15 -24.

I had several suicide attempts. It’s not that I want to die. I want to live, but I can’t live with the dread of waking up every morning wondering if today I can get out of bed. That may seem silly to most people. “Just get out of bed” people say. But for me, getting out of the bed in the morning is a work. Can I make it to the shower? Things people take for granted, take a lot of effort for me on most days. The days I get out of bed might be the highlight of the day. What use to seem normal, now is drudgery. So I have to fight to get out of bed, to take a shower, to comb my hair. These are my good days. Why do I fight?

I fight to live. I fight because I don’t want to die. I look at the photos I have taped to my walls to remind me I’ve had good days, when my brain tells me all is lost. I have to visually see the photos to put my mind at ease, and because I’ve had good days, I can tell myself more good days are waiting for me. I fight because no matter how painful my days may seem, death is the permanent. There is no coming back.

I fight by taking my medication, seeing my doctor and my therapist. I fight by going to NAMI (National Alliance for Mental Illness) and DBSA (Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance) support group meetings. I can process my good and bad days with people who have gone through what I’m going through.

I fight because I want to see my daughters graduate from college. I want to be at there on their wedding day. I want to see my grandchildren (which I have 4) grow up and give them the love and support only a grandmother can give. So I fight.

All is not lost. Find your reason to fight. It helps you build resilience. It gets you through the minutes, hours, days where your mental illness tries to consume you. Find your reason to fight. Find your reason to live, even when you’re taking baby steps toward healing. Fight with all you’re might.

If you are having thoughts of suicide or feel you are in crisis, please call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or call 911 and go to the nearest emergency room. I can tell you it works. Now fight!